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less than he offered before the election and also raises the money taken out of medicare and medicaid by $62 billion. how democrats or anybody could except that -- could accept that. the average folks here in america do not want to pay their fair share. they cannot argue the point that everybody has to give a little bit more to help us eliminate some of this debt and keep the country going in a positive direction. host: did you see the reaction from harry reid? caller: [laughter] host: let me read a portion of that. that is what the democratic leader in the senate had to say about yesterday's counterproposal put out by house republicans. we noted in this letter sent to the white house from the speaker also includes the signatures of paul ryan as well as eric cantor and the rest of his leadership team seems to be on board. here is the chairman of the republican study committee's statement. so here are the opening offers in "the washington post." time." there is the side-by-side in the "the washington times" this morning. a democratic caller, what do you think? caller: by listening at w
to stress the need for elected officials to act. for not only has the passage of time exacerbated some of the economic problems, it has revealed a perhaps equally-dangerous political one. our inability to grapple with pressing fiscal challenges represents nothing less than a crisis in our democratic order. compounding the instability and unpredictability in a volatile world. our propositions for this coalition are simple. the national security of the united states depends on its economic health. that health must be insured by averting the immediate crises and by laying the groundwork for a rigorous, long-term program of debt reduction, smart investment, economic growth and lower income inequality. in national security spending, we can target investments much more efficiently in response to threats that are evolving before our eyes. and resources need to be shifted toward nonmilitary elements of our national security posture. in the immediate term -- and by that i mean over the next four weeks -- we must avoid driving our country over the fiscal cliff. no partisan ideology is worth the
thinks since he won the election, he should get his own way. he wins and the taxes on everybody. a one term president was not suggested until president obama said "elections have consequences, and i won the." it was after that that the statement was made. they have roadbed dead horse for miles and miles and miles and it is getting bad. what that meant was it was his way or no way. that is why people said they were working towards a one-term president for him. obama is trying to wreck the economy so he can set up his socialist and communist government and agenda and people will be weak enough they will accept it. host: sarah from west virginia. let's of columns in the paper today. here is one from "the washington times." i want to take you to "the washington post." i want to go to janet from massachusetts on the democratic line. caller: good morning. how are you? i just wanted to say i remember when the bush gave us all $250 per adult for our tax cuts. you add those up and it becomes quite a big sum of money. it is a pittance for individuals, but it is a big amount of money. that was th
for the introduction. last week at the right house, we had our first meeting since the election. it was a chance for me to banks -- thank my entire team for their service for keeping the country safe and strong. few have done more than you in that regard. that includes taking care of our remarkable men and women in uniform and their families. keeping our military the best in the world bar none. thank you for being such an outstanding secretary of defense. [applause] i am not here to give a big speech. i wanted to come by and join you in marking the 20th anniversary of one of the country's smartest and most successful national security programs. people in this room conceived it and build it. i want to a knowledge a leader who now helps guide the secretary of defense. thank you for your great work. [applause] you have to think about what real visionaries do. you look at the world and see what is missing. they set out to fill the gap. to build something new. to imagine after decades of confrontation how our nations might engage in cooperation. early in the cold war, einstein warned of the danger of our wi
relationship, i don't think that that kind of thing -- >> what matters is japan does have election on the summer 16th. are they worried about china trying to put together a leader democracy in the region including india because that was his strategy that if you put together things, much more like your when you think, i know you can't in your position talk one way or another about prime minister but this notion about a strategic -- is japan really need to invest in structures that balance -- are you worried that given your experience you have to balance china much more vigorously than you did in the past? >> yes. most frequently you ask question for japanese people is whether we regard china as a threat or a chance for an hour and should is would like to see china development as a chance rather than threat. >> what you think will really happen? >> there is a assumption that china continues to be kind of international stakeholder, stakeholder, international community. international order and they respect the communication with the other countries. on the assumption i think we can wel
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5